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Seaweed can lower blood pressure

Seaweed can lower blood pressure

Proteins discovered in rare seaweed could lower blood pressure. Recent reports suggests that this seaweed, Seanol, which was discovered in South Korea by local fishermen, could add years to your life and benefit everyone, especially individuals who have extremely high blood pressure levels.

According to Dr. Haengwoo Lee, the biochemist leading the project, Seanol works at a cellular level and can slow down the causes of aging and age-related diseases. This process can help prevent the starvation of healthy cells that die off later in life. He also believes that Seanol can help remove harmful toxins from the human body. Lee and his team hope to form a supplement from the proteins. 

"Seaweed has long been known to have high levels of positive health benefits, but scientists have not found a living plant that when ingested could return blood pressure to previously normal levels," writes Joseph Mayton of Tech Times. "The discovery could do wonders for the growing levels of those suffering from high blood pressure in the U.S. and elsewhere."

Although the medical world hasn't commented on these most recent findings yet, previous research also suggests the heart-healthy benefits of seaweed. In the future this rare seaweed could be added to a medicine in order to lower blood pressure levels.

Are you looking to eat healthier and possibly lower your blood pressure? Try Seagreens® seaweed, with its clear health benefits and use as a salt replacement in foods! This natural multi-nutrient whole food contains all the minerals, trace elements and vitamin groups, and is wild-harvested in the Grade A pristine waters of the Scottish Outer Hebrides to Seagreens' proprietary Human Food Seaweed™ standards (patents pending). For more information, browse our selection of our products that make it easy to add the highest standard of seaweed into your daily diet!

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